Healthy & Easy Vegan Smoothie Bowls

It seems as though this week, all of Europe has been experiencing better weather, but London does not want to play along! It’s been drousy, grey, rainy, basically everything we don’t want. As we had a few really lovely days, I got excited and immediately started making smoothie bowls again. Summer ’18 was all about the smoothie bowl, and they’re still my go-to whenever the sun comes out. They are so refreshing and versatile. So today, I will show you two of my favourite smoothie bowls that I eat to stay cool in hot summer weather. Or as an antidote to London’s boring grey skies.

Number one: the infamous Berry Bowl! Now, I think perhaps every food blog features this one. You can’t blame any of us bloggers, because the gorgeous colours of this smoothie bowl are too good not to share.

As I will describe below in the recipe, these bowls are super easy to make. They literally take 5 minutes. You do need a blender or kitchen processor to make your life easier. And the best thing is: I always use the same base for my smoothie bowls, and I add anything I want to it from there. This means you can very easily customise this recipe to suit you!

Number two: my lovely Mango & Fennel Seed smoothie bowl. This one is inspired by my favourite drink at Dishoom London. Dishoom is an Indian restaurant that I love to go to. I always order the Mango Lassi, which is a really thick and creamy yogurt smoothie. Mango is one of the traditional flavours to use, but at Dishoom they add some fennel seeds on top. The anisey flavour of the fennel works so well with the creaminess of the yogurt and the sweetness of the mango, it’s just perfect! I like to add some turmeric to this bowl for an extra Indian spice punch, plus turmeric has numerous health benefits like I talked about in my Turmeric & Apple Pancakes recipe.

Easy 5-Minute Vegan Smoothie Bowls

This smoothie bowl recipe is:

  • Healthy
  • Easy
  • Customisable
  • 100% Vegan
  • Delicious!

The method is really easy. Just add all the ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth, transfer to a bowl and top off with your favourite toppings! If you are a very hungry person in the morning, simply double the smoothie recipe and you’re good to go. You can also easily prepare the smoothie base in advance by pre-blending the smoothie base and storing it in your fridge for ±4 days max. Ready-made smoothie bowls for day after day! Also, this recipe is perfect for people who like to use protein powders. Add a scoop of your favourite protein powder to the smoothie base and you’re done. Same for any superfood powder you use; I love to add 1 tsp of Spirulina powder sometimes because it’s a natural source of Vitamin B12 and it’s rich in plant protein.

Ingredients

The essentials:

  • 1 banana in slices, frozen
  • 150 ml soy yogurt (Berry Bowl) or coconut yogurt (Mango Bowl)
  • 50 ml unsweetened plant-based milk of your choice (I used almond milk in these bowls)

Add-ins for the Berry Bowl:

  • 1/2 cup (a big handful) of mixed frozen berries

Add-ins for the Mango & Fennel Bowl:

  • 1/2 cup ripe mango
  • 1 tsp turmeric powder

Toppings for your bowl:

  • Home-made or store-bought granola
  • Any fresh fruits (I like blueberries and raspberries)
  • Fennel seeds for Mango Bowls!
  • Chia seeds or flax seeds
  • Dessicated Coconut
  • Any dried fruits (I like chopped dates)
  • Edible blue corn flower

I hope you enjoy trying out smoothie bowls at home. Be sure to tag me on Instagram @bakingstori in your smoothie bowls, I would love to see them! Have a nice week everyone. X Tori

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Vegan Kanelbullar (Swedish Cinnamon Buns)

This weekend, I had breakfast at a Danish bakery in London Fields with my boyfriend. It is called The Bread Station and it’s a pretty cool industrial-looking bakery/café underneath the train tracks. They mostly do wholesale to other shops, so you can actually see the bakers at work producing large quantities of pastry and sourdough bread! I had a delicious “Kanelbullar” with my coffee, which is a Swedish cinnamon bun (not very Danish, but oh well). I absolutely love cinnamon buns: the crunchy outside with the soft, enriched dough on the inside… the way you can pull the different layers apart… the delicious sugary cinnamon stuffing… need I say more?

I have wanted to make cinnamon rolls for a long time, but I could never decide which kind I wanted to make. But after seeing the lovely knotted Swedish buns, there was no doubt in my mind. I had to have a go at these myself. Swedish people love these so much, they even have a national day to celebrate them! The 4th of October is “Kanelbullens Dag” (Cinnamon Bun Day) in Sweden. Unfortunately, my timing is not that good, because it is nowhere near October, but hey: you don’t need a national day to enjoy these. The Kanelbulle is a popular treat to have during “fika”, which is the Swedish word for coffee break. It is comparable to British afternoon tea, but more often it’s coffee with pastry instead of tea with scones!

Some of you might already know that I am pescotarian (have been for 3 years now), although most of the stuff I eat is plant-based. However, because I have started to bake a lot more, I have been using a lot more animal products like eggs, milk and butter than I used to. In an attempt to reduce my use of animal products, I decided to make these buns vegan. Traditionally, Kanelbullar have a butter & sugar filling, but I have found that using vegetable oil instead of butter is just as delicious! These homemade buns were just as good (if not better!) than the non-vegan ones I had at The Bread Station.

You can get these lovely homemade buns on the table in just over 2 hours time. Trust me, it’s worth the wait! My roommate and her boyfriend were really happy with me this morning 😉 Without further ado, let’s get to the recipe.

Vegan Kanelbullar (Swedish Cinnamon Buns)

Ingredients (makes around 16 buns)

  • Dough
  • 250 ml almond milk
  • 60 ml boiling water
  • 7 gr active dried yeast
  • 1 tsp granulated sugar
  • 370 gr plain flour
  • 40 gr white bread wheat flour + extra for dusting
  • 60 gr soft brown sugar
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground cardamom
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 60 ml vegetable oil
  • Filling
  • 60 ml vegetable oil
  • 100 gr soft brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp ground cinnamon
  • Icing
  • 6 tbsp powdered sugar
  • 2 tbsp water
  • Decoration
  • Handful of almond flakes

Method

Start by activating your yeast. Combine the almond milk, hot water, and 1 tsp sugar. Check the temperature: you want it to be around 26 degrees (that’s what the yeast likes). If it’s not warm enough, just pop it in the microwave for a few seconds. Then stir in the dried yeast and set aside to become bubbly.

In a large bowl, combine the flours, spices and sugar. I like to use a little bit of wheat bread flour next to plain flour, because I find it adds some structure. Feel free to use just plain flour if that’s what you have on hand. I do recommend adding the ground cardamom: it adds SO much to the flavour of these buns. It is definitely worth spending the few pounds on to get!

Make a well in the middle and pour in the oil and the activated yeast mixture. Mix with your hands until the dough comes together, then flour the surface and knead for 10 minutes until you have a smooth, elastic dough. The dough will be sticky in the beginning but it will get easier to handle as you go along. You might need to add a little extra flour depending on temperature and humidity, but be careful not to add it too soon as the kneading really does make the dough less sticky eventually.

Place your dough in an oiled bowl and cover with a clean kitchen towel. Place somewhere warm and leave to prove for 1 to 1,5 hours until doubled in size.

When your dough has proved, tip it onto a lightly floured surface and roll out into a square until the dough is 1 cm thick. Combine the oil, sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and spread the mixture on the dough. Preheat your oven to 180 degrees Celsius.

Spread the mixture out until you can only see around 1 cm of the edges (so bit more than the photo on top). Then, fold the dough like an envelop: take the upper edge and fold it 1/3 down, then take the bottom edge and fold that op 1/3d of the way. Roll the envelop out again so that you get a rectangle of around 40×20 cm. Divide in long, 2cm wide strips. Watch the following video to see how to knot your buns: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHNFA4hcpok

Place your knotted cinnamon buns on a baking tray lined with parchment and bake them for 15-20 minutes (depending on the size). When they’re cooled halfway, whip up a quick icing by combining powdered sugar with some water (the more powdered sugar you add, the thicker and whiter the icing, the more water the more translucent and thin the icing. You do you!). Top the buns with your icing and sprinkle some almond flakes on top. Enjoy!

Serve these lovely buns with a cup of steaming hot coffee and indulge! Be sure to show me your results if you do try this recipe. I love to see your bakes, so get in touch on instagram

Lots of love, Tori

The Pancake Series #2: Healthy Turmeric & Apple Pancakes

Turmeric is one of my favourite spices. I always have some powdered turmeric stored in my cupboard. It is so incredibly versatile: I use it in lovely Indian curry dishes, but I also like to use it in sweet cooking. Although more unconventional, as turmeric is more often used savoury because of its slightly bitter, earthy aroma, I think turmeric goes wonderfully with something sweet! No wonder the “turmeric latte” is very popular, appearing on more and more menus in London coffee shops.

The turmeric latte is actually what inspired me to make this dish for lunch today. My mum came home from the hairdresser this morning, proclaiming she wanted to stop drinking as much coffee. So I asked her if she maybe wanted to have a turmeric latte instead. She replied: “Why would I want that? Putting turmeric in it doesn’t mean it’s not coffee anymore, and that’s exactly what I’m trying to avoid!” I laughed, because this is exactly the same mistake I made the first time I ordered a turmeric latte in a cafe. Baffled, I asked the waitress: “Uhm, maybe I’m being really weird, but are you sure there’s coffee in this?” She looked at me funnily and said: “I sure hope not, ’cause it’s supposed to be without any coffee!”. So there I had it: a latte without coffee. And then I realized, of course “latte” does not mean COFFEE WITH MILK. It just means: MILK. It’s just that we are so used to ordering a “latte” that we tend to forget that it’s basically an abbreviation of caffè latte. So I made my mum and myself a turmeric latte (real easy: heat up 400 ml soy milk, or any other milk, in a small saucepan add 1 tsp ground turmeric, 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon, 1 tsp honey, 1 tsp vanilla extract & whisk til the top becomes frothy, and serve in a glass!). My mum absolutely loved it. And I said to her: could you put this in a pancake?

The answer is Hell. Yes. You can definitely put turmeric in a pancake. One trip to Google.com and I would’ve had the answer, but instead I just went for it. And boy, was I happy I did. I decided to pair the turmeric with some grated apple and it just works. You have to try it for yourself, because my descriptions wouldn’t really do it justice. These pancakes are super healthy: I had these for lunch after my 6k run today and felt re-energized immediately! There is no butter or artificial sugar in these, just one egg, one apple, wholemeal spelt flour, oat flour and soy milk. The topping is quark (a really thick sort of yoghurt with a high protein and low fat content that is very common in The Netherlands), some roughly chopped hazelnuts and some left-over grated apple. And of course, there is turmeric in these pancakes. Turmeric contains curcumin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties*. Not only is inflammation bad for your bodily health, there is new evidence suggesting that depression can be caused by inflammation levels too. I just started reading a book about it and I find it very interesting, it’s called The Inflamed Mind by Edward Bullmore. Further research should elucidate this more, but for now I’ll happily put a teaspoon of turmeric in my pancakes! Turmeric’s yellow colour makes me happy already so even if that’s all driving the effect, that’s fine by me. Let’s get to that recipe now.

Turmeric & Apple Wholemeal Pancakes

Ingredients (for 1 portion)

  • 1 medium egg
  • 1 large apple (I used Jonagold)
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 40 gr wholemeal spelt flour
  • 10 gr wholemeal fine oats
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 80 ml light soy milk (or any other milk)
  • 2 tbsp quark (or a low-fat, high-protein yoghurt)
  • 1 tbsp hazelnuts
  • some oil for frying

Method

Peel and grate the apple coarsely (if you do it too finely, it is a bit too wet). Place the grated apple in a bowl, reserving just a teaspoon or so for decorating. Add the egg, turmeric, cinnamon and vanilla and whisk to combine everything. Then, add the spelt flour, the oats (you can use these in any ratio you like, as long as you add 50 grams in total) and the baking powder. Whisk again and then add your milk. I like to use light soy milk, because it adds sweetness without the cals. 😉 You might not need all of the milk: keep adding and whisking until the batter is the thickness you desire. I like mine thick but still pourable. Bake the pancakes in a little bit of oil of your choice. I used sunflower oil because it has a neutral flavour, it can resist high temperatures and it contains mostly unsaturated fats (the healthy kinda fat). Bake on low-medium heat til browned on both sides and stack the pancakes. Top with two tablespoons of quark, the left-over grated apple, some hazelnuts (just smash them a bit with a pestle & mortar or chop them) and a tiny sprinkle of ground turmeric. Enjoy!

I hope you enjoyed the story about how today’s bake came about. Do let me know when you try these. I love seeing your results! Feel free to share on Instagram and tag me @bakingstori. Until next time! X

*Source: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/top-10-evidence-based-health-benefits-of-turmeric#section7

The Pancake Series #1: Blueberry Pancakes

Hello lovely people,

I hope you all had a lovely first month of 2019. My January was all about indulging in extravagant breakfasts: homemade breads, scones, richly topped oatmeals… but mostly: PANCAKES! Those of you who know me a bit and follow me on instagram, have seen me eat looooads of pancakes this month. So it won’t come as a surprise that I have decided to start a Pancake Series on my blog. I really want to do one, for multiple reasons.

First of all, I think pancakes are my strong suit, as they are something I’ve been working on for ages. My baking obsession only started recently (Sept 2018 I guess), but even before that you could catch me baking pancakes at least biweekly. Second of all, I think pancakes are such versatile things and you can experiment with so many different flavour combinations, making it the perfect dish to do a series on. And last but not least, I have decided to bake more healthy things as I can feel my veins clogging more and more by the minute!! Lucky for me, pancakes are one of those dishes that you can easily adapt to something more healthy and nutritious.

Do not despair, however, cause the first recipe of this series will be extremely indulgent and unhealthy and a true cheat meal, ’cause these babies were born before my recent aspirations of healthy baking!

My wish for this series is to post a new pancake recipe fortnightly. I should be able to manage that, as I eat pancakes at least once a week. I would LOVE to hear what kind of pancakes you want me to feature in this series, so be sure to contact me with your ideas. Either drop me a message via the “contact” page on my blog, or simply send me a message on Instagram, and I might feature your pancake idea!

Without further ado, let’s get to the recipe for these fluffy, milky, delicious blueberry pancakes.

American Blueberry Pancakes with White Chocolate Ganache Sauce

Ingredients (serves 3-4)

  • 1 egg
  • 1 egg white
  • 300 ml whole milk (dairy-free milks are also fine)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 200 gr self-raising flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 150 gr fresh blueberries
  • 50 gr white chocolate
  • 25 ml double cream

Method

Start by preparing the pancake batter. Mix the whole egg and egg white with the milk and vanilla extract. Add the flour and baking powder, but save 1 tbsp of flour to coat 100 grams of the blueberries. The coating will prevent the blueberries from sinking to the bottom of the pancake. Gently fold in the 100 gr of blueberries, saving the other 50 grams for topping. Bake the pancakes on medium-high heat for 2 minutes on each side. I use a 1/4 cup measure spoon to scoop the batter into the pan to get pancakes that are roughly the same size. I bake 3 small pancakes at a time in one pan, but you can experiment with this depending on the size of your frying pan. When you are almost out of pancake batter, prepare the sauce. Heat the double cream either in a microwave in 20 second intervals or in a small saucepan on the stove until it is simmering. You don’t want it to boil. Meanwhile, finely chop the chocolate and pour the hot double cream on top. Cover the bowl with a plate and let it sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove the plate and whisk the chocolate & cream mixture to melt any chocolate chunks left. Stack the pancakes on a cute plate, top with fresh blueberries, and pour the lovely, rich white chocolate ganache sauce on top. Enjoy!

I hope you give these pancakes a go and be sure to let me know when you do! Be sure to follow my blog by email & follow me on instagram to be notified when my next pancake recipe is coming in hot. Next time will be more healthy, just so you know…

Love, Tori

Super Moist Apple Cake

Hello everyone!

January is flying by, I can’t believe we’re already halfway through. In my brain we were still in the first week of January, which is why I’m so delayed posting this recipe! For those of you following me on instagram, you already saw my Apple Cake turning up. (Can’t believe how much love it received!)

I made this cake completely out of the blue in Amsterdam. My dad had gone to the gym and I wanted to surprise him. He is a loyal follower of the blog (thanks Dad!) and told me he wanted me to bake him all that nice stuff when I come home. As he likes my apple pie, I decided to try a new recipe using apple. I basically just threw some ingredients together and I can’t believe how amazing it turned out.

This apple cake is so moist. Partly because of the homemade apple puree that I used, but also because of the mix of butter and vegetable oil I used. I actually did that because I didn’t find enough butter in my mum’s fridge, so I just threw some extra oil in (nothing worse than a dried-out cake). But I ended up being very pleased with it: the oil gives the cake that classic cake-like moisture whereas the butter adds depth in flavour.

So without further ado, let’s get to the recipe!

Super Moist Apple Cake

Ingredients

For the apple puree:

  • 3 apples
  • 3 tbsp white granulated sugar
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp water

For the cake:

  • 40 grams butter (room temperature)
  • 50 ml vegetable oil
  • 100 grams white granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 150 grams plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt

For the decoration:

  • 2 apples cut in thin slices
  • powdered sugar for dusting

Instructions

Start by preparing the apple puree. Cut the apples into chunks and add them together with the other ingredients to a sauce pan over low heat. Boil 10 minutes or until soft, stirring every now and then. Mash the apple using a potato masher if you want a very fine sauce, or alternatively leave some chunks of apple in there if you prefer. Set the puree aside to cool and preheat your oven to 160 degrees Celsius.

In a large bowl, mix the butter, oil and sugar together with a hand-held electric whisk until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one by one until incorporated and mix another 2 minutes. Add the vanilla extract and apple puree and mix a bit more.

Fold in the flour, baking powder and salt. Be careful not to overmix. Pour the batter into a round cake tin (I used 21 cm diameter). Top with the thinly sliced apples, sprinkle some sugar on top and bake for 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Cool for 20 minutes and sprinkle with powdered sugar before serving.

My dad lent me his camera and it was such a pleasure taking pictures with that instead of my phone!

Thanks for reading guys and be sure to sign up to get email notifications if I post something 🙂

Love,

Tori

How to Create YOUR OWN Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

Do you have your own perfect chocolate chip recipe yet? I think I have finally found mine. These XXL chocolate chip cookies are crispy on the edges, but chewy in the middle. They’re loaded with dark chocolate and they have a not-too-subtle hint of sea salt, because I am a sucker for salted-chocolate-anything. Also, they’re thin and crunchy, not thick and cakey. But here’s the thing: my preferences are most likely not the same as yours. I have tried numerous chocolate chip cookie recipes, all claiming to be “foolproof” or “the best ever” or “perfect” and “unbeatable”. And sure, they are all going to taste good… but why?! What does every single ingredient contribute and how do I manipulate a recipe to get the cookies exactly the way I want them? That’s why, a thousand cookies and a hundred hours of reading about the science of cookie baking later, I came up with a step-by-step guide to create your own perfect chocolate chip cookie recipe.

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Before we continue to the Cookie Guide, let’s talk through the traditional list of ingredients and what they do. Recipes traditionally start out with room temperature butter, creamed together with sugar (either 100% granulated or a mix of different kinds). Butter gives your cookies moisture, texture and a lot of depth in flavour. That’s why substituting butter for shortening or oil will never render the same result: butter has a rich, distinct flavour. If you use melted butter instead of room temperature butter, your cookies will be more “cracky” on the surface. Cold butter is more difficult to work with, as you have to cream the butter for a few minutes to make a light and fluffy butter+sugar mix. I don’t recommend it!

Now, as for the sugar: sugar makes cookies sweet (duh), but it also serves other functions. When you heat up sugar (like you do in the oven), it crystallizes and promotes browning of your cookie, giving it that attractive look. It also helps retain moisture and because of it’s absorbing powers, it also helps to reduce gluten development, making for an extra tender cookie. What type of sugar you choose, depends on your own preferences. White granulated sugar is suitable for almost any recipe because it is a neutral tasting sugar. Light & dark brown sugar are granulated sugar with molasses added to it. This gives the sugar extra moist-retaining abilities, so using brown sugars make your cookies extra chewy. Dark brown sugar has the most molasses added to it and thus provides the most moisture. Importantly, brown sugar has acidity which reacts with baking soda, making your cookies more tall rather than flat. White sugar doesn’t have this property. Muscovado sugar is an unrefined cane sugar. Because it is minimally processed, the molasses is naturally present in this type of sugar, making it suitable for use in baking where a strong molasses flavour is desirable like in gingerbread.

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After creaming the butter and sugar, traditional recipes call for the adding of egg. This helps bind the dough together and it helps the cookies spread out whilst they bake. After this step, some recipes add a teaspoon of vanilla extract for extra flavour. That is it for the wet ingredients. As for the dry ingredients, plain flour is mixed with some salt and baking soda. Some people say baking powder makes your cookies more cakey, but I haven’t experienced this myself. Truth be told, I’ve baked cookies using just soda, just powder, or a mix of both, and I find it hard to tell the difference. I settled with using baking powder, because it doesn’t need any acidity like baking soda in order to make the leavening happen. That way I don’t have to add anything else, because I don’t use acidic brown sugar in my recipe.

The amount of flour you use determines the structure of your cookies. A 1 to 1 ratio of flour to butter will make your cookies very thin and spread out, whereas by adding a lot more flour, they will hardly change shape as they bake. Some people like adding some bread flour, which will make your cookies more dense and chewy because of the higher protein content (=more gluten development).

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Now, let’s talk salt. You cannot underestimate the importance of salt in any baking recipe. Adding salt makes the flavour of all other ingredients pop. This is especially true for chocolate if you ask me. About that chocolate: you can use any type of chocolate you prefer, ranging from white to 98% cocoa dark chocolate. Whatever floats your boat! That being said, it is time to turn to the step-by-step guide to creating your own perfect chocolate chip recipe. Ready? Go!

The Guide to Creating Your Own Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

Every baker needs their own hallmark chocolate chip cookie. But not every baker has the time or money (or appetite!) to test a hundred different cookie recipes. That’s where this guide comes in. Follow the steps and create your cookie just the way you like it without all the fuzz! Following this guide you will create around 10 XXL cookies or 16 smaller ones.

Step 1: butter is where it all starts

Amount: 115 grams (1/2 cup) for Tori’s Cookies. Use 130 grams for more fatty, buttery, spread out cookies. Use only 100 grams for a tougher cookie.

Temperature: room temperature for Tori’s Cookies. Melted butter for a dense cookie with a cracked top.

Creaming: adds air, making your cookie more light and makes the dough fluffy. The longer you cream your butter, the more cakey the cookie will be. I settle for 1 minute with a hand-held electric mixer.

Butter alternative: should you wish to use no butter for whatever reason, I advice replacing it with equal amount margarine with a high fat and low water content.

Step 2: sugarbaby

Amount: 200 grams (1 cup) for Tori’s Cookies. These are tooth achingly sweet. Use 150 grams for more subtle sweetness, but less than that and you will seriously compromise on texture.

Type of sugar:

Tori’s Cookie: 50% white granulated sugar & 50% white “basterdsuiker”. (Basterdsuiker is a Dutch thing. It has more flavour than granulated sugar, just like brown sugar. I use the white and not the brown variety because I like my cookies to stay pale, to get that nice contrast with the chocolate.)

Super crunchy + pale, no molasses flavour: 100% white granulated sugar

Crunchy + chewy: 50% white granulated sugar & 50% light brown sugar

Crunchy + chewy + caramelly: 50% white granulated sugar & 50% dark brown or muscovado sugar

Just chewy, less crunch: 100% brown sugar

Creaming: cream the butter and sugar together for 1 minute to dissolve the sugar. Cream longer for more air and fluffiness.

Step 3: egg 

Amount:

Tori’s Cookie: 1 egg

More fudgy cookie: 1 egg + 1 egg yolk

More fluffy, tall cookie: 1 egg + 1 egg white

Method: beat egg whites separately for extra rising. Just beat in the egg for Tori’s Cookies.

Step 4: vanilla

Either use 1 tsp good quality vanilla extract or don’t use it. If you are using white chocolate, don’t use the extra vanilla, because it’s already in the white chocolate.

Step 5: flour

Amount:

Tori’s Cookie: 130 grams (1 cup) plain flour

Extra chewy cookie: 120 grams plain flour + 1 tbsp white bread flour

Method: add to wet ingredients together but do not overmix or your cookie will be very tough!

Step 6: leavening agent

Tori’s Cookie: 1 tsp baking powder

When using brown sugar: 1 tsp baking soda (acid in brown sugar reacts with the baking soda)

Method: mix with the flour before adding to wet ingredients to make it spread evenly

Step 7: salt

Tori’s Cookie: 1 tsp salt in batter + 3 whole sea salt crystals or sea salt flakes on top of every cookie before baking

“Unsalted”: 1 tsp salt in batter (cookies won’t taste salty)

Actually unsalted: if for any reason you wish to use no salt, try adding 1/2 tsp of ground chili. This will enhance the chocolate flavour as well.

Step 8: chocolate

Add as much chocolate of any kind you like. I like to cut up 100 grams of extra dark chocolate with a serrated knife and I add some extra bits to every cookie once I’ve placed the cookie dough scoops on an oven tray so you can really see large bits of chocolate on top of the cookies once they’re done.

Step 9: baking

Tori’s Cookie (XXL!): bake scoops the size of 1 tbsp for 8-10 minutes on 190 degrees Celsius, watching your cookies like a hawk after the 8 minute mark so you don’t overbake them. I like my cookies underbaked, with crispy edges but soft inside.

Completely baked: bake for 12 minutes on 190 degrees Celsius

For smaller cookies, decrease the baking time around 2 minutes.

Make sure to spread your cookies enough so they don’t overlap when they start to spread in the oven.

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Hopefully this guide was a bit helpful in deciding what the recipe for your own perfect cookie should look like. For those of you who just want to replicate the cookies shown in this blog post, here’s my own preferred recipe.

Tori’s Favourite Choc Chip Cookies

Preparation time: 15 mins – Baking time: 8-10 mins – Total: 30 mins – Yield: 10 XXL cookies

Ingredients

  • 115 grams butter on room temp
  • 100 gr white granulated sugar
  • 100 gr white “basterd” sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 130 gr plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt + extra salt crystals on top of cookie
  • 100 gr dark chocolate + extra chunks on top of cookie

Method

Preheat your oven to 190 degrees Celsius and line an oven tray with parchment paper. Cream the butter for a minute with a hand-held electric mixer, then add the sugar and cream for another 2 minutes. Add the egg and vanilla and mix to incorporate. Combine the flour, baking powder and salt in a separate bowl and mix. Then add to the wet ingredients, being careful not to overmix. Chop up 100 grams of dark chocolate with a serrated knife, created uneven bits. Fold into the cookie dough. Make your hands slightly wet (so the dough doesn’t stick) and shape round dough balls the size of a pingpong ball. Spread out on a baking tray leaving enough room in between. Add some extra chunks of chocolate on top of every cookie, plus some salt flakes or crystals. Bake the cookies so the edges are crispy and golden but the middle is still soft. This takes around 8-10 minutes, but watch the cookies like a hawk. Leave the cookies to cool on the baking tray for 10 minutes, allowing the middle to set just a bit more before transferring them to a cooling rack for another 5 minutes. Enjoy!

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Be sure to take some pictures of your cookies 😉

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Thanks a lot for reading and I hope all of you will have a lovely 2019,

Tori